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May
31st
Fri
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LOVE
brycedotvc:

After all the talk of VCs vs. Founders.
This.
This is the kind of relationship we’re all hoping to build with the founders we back.
Congratulations to all involved.
via bijan

LOVE

brycedotvc:

After all the talk of VCs vs. Founders.

This.

This is the kind of relationship we’re all hoping to build with the founders we back.

Congratulations to all involved.

via bijan


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May
27th
Mon
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It is not ok to hate me

Why is it ok hate on VCs? Why is it ok to generalize about our motivations, behaviors, and capabilities? Why is it ok to call us dumb?

I am a VC. I love being a VC and am proud to be one.

For some reason, it has become accepted practice in our industry to regularly and voiciforously disparage those of us who have dedicated our lives to supporting entrepreneurship as VCs. I am still new to this industry, but in my short experience I have found the vast majority of my venture colleagues to be some of the smartest, hardest working, most passionate people I’ve ever known. None of them do this because it is the easiest and most efficient way to make the most money. They do it because they are inspired by the work and are dedicated to the mission.    

Maybe I’m just fortunate to be a part of a new generation of venture investors. Maybe it’s because I am outside the echo chamber of Sand Hill Road. Or maybe it’s because the experience that I’ve had actually represents the rule, while the exception is the lazy asshole VC who gives us all a bad name. I really don’t know. 

What I do know is that I find it incredibly offensive to read vitriolic rhetoric such as that found in Andy Dunn’s post endearingly entitled “Dear Dumb VC”. Sadly, VC hating is en vogue; those who espouse it are sometimes revered as heroes, and VCs who vocally object are sometimes vilified as ignorant, out of touch or worse. 

But I do object! 

Not to content of the criticisms - many of which are legitimate (see Mark Suster’s comprehensive response) - but to the tone with which it is conveyed and to the simplistic use of generalization that causally disregards the individuals involved. 

Being a VC is a great job. I wake up every day and am blessed with the responsibility to interact with brilliant and creative innovators who desperately want to impact the world. I have the opportunity to work with and watch companies grow from nothing more than a dream to a tangible reality. I have a front row seat from which to view the bleeding edge of innovation.  

But please, don’t hate me because I my love job.

Succeeding as a VC is incredibly difficult. Any way you slice the data, the fact is that the majority of venture firms underperform. Success in our industry requires a combination of intellect, experience and a boatload of luck. It’s not good enough to invest in a bunch ‘good’ companies; the structural dynamics of the venture business demand that I invest in ‘home runs’ (think half-billion $+ outcomes) in order to generate the 3x+ return on capital that will make make our fund top quartile and provide us with the opportunity to raise new funds and continue as a going concern. With only a few opportunities to invest in companies that have the potential to go from zero to gargantuan, the odds are incredibly stacked against me. This is not a challenge or responsibility easily taken for granted. 

Confronting these odds, I work extremely hard, working very closely with eight companies and putting in tremendous effort trying to find the next eight. This is not a part time gig nor does it begin and end with daylight office hours. I do not own a boat nor do I take the month of August off.  

So please, don’t hate me as the rich and lazy entitled VC.

I am also self aware of my place in the value chain. I am not the entrepreneur. I am not the innovator and am not the operator. I do not create nor do I build. Therefore, I do not deserve the credit for a company’s success. I am not the hero and world changer; that title belongs to the entrepreneur. 

But I am also not useless. I enable with a check book; assist with my own sweat, intellect, experience and relationships; support with extreme honesty and empathy. I do whatever I can, to the best of my ability, to help our companies. Sometimes I succeed in being more helpful than hurtful and sometimes I fail, but I always try my best.

So please, don’t hate me for stealing your credit.

I do what I do because I am obsessed with technology entrepreneurship and have chosen to spend my life to working with people who are building companies that change the world. My lot is tied to these people. I have no reason to apologize for contributing to this effort from my vantage point as a VC because I love what I do, work my ass off, understand my role and appreciate its limitations. 

My grandmother used to always remind me that there is always room for improvement. Venture investors both individually and collectively are not immune to this sage truism. Despite our imperfections, it saddens me to have to write a post like this - defending my professional existence against those who view me as dumb and worthless. I hope that collectively we can move beyond such petty slander and engage in respectful discourse. 

Years ago I wrote a post entitled Humility and Hubris. I’ll close with quote from it:

We hold ourselves to a higher standard in our industry, the world of early stage entrepreneurship. We come to work every day with unbridled passion and profound sense of purpose - we are changing the world for the better…The entrepreneurship eco-system is blessed with incredibly vibrant and transparent discourse. We are all entitled to strong, well reasoned and experience-informed positions, but let’s focus on making the conversation positive by respectfully expressing opinions, engaging in open-minded dialogue and injecting humility into our interactions.

 


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Apr
19th
Fri
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"You dont need mdma for this music cause, cause the music is so incredibly vivid"
- Pharrell

(Source: Spotify)


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Apr
17th
Wed
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Kinsa

The world of healthcare is undergoing massive transformation. Powerful mobile devices provide us immediate access to our personal health information as well as the ability to interact directly with our health service providers. An emerging suite of connected hardware is empowering a wave of new ‘smart’ health products that interact with the broader connected network. And data captured from these ‘smart’ devices is being leveraged to enrich user experiences and optimize health outcomes. 

With these concepts in mind, I am extremely excited to announce our lead investment in Kinsa. Kinsa sits at the epicenter of the mobile health, connected device and big data megatrends. Kinsa’s overarching mission is to create a real-time map of human health in order to track the spread of communicable disease in real-time and enable interventions to stop it. The Company’s first product is a re-invention of the world’s most widely used medical device: the thermometer. 

The Kinsa Smart Thermometer qualitatively changes the way taking your temperature impacts your understanding of your health condition. There are three principal benefits:

  1. Enriched experience - in addition to the Smart Thermometer, Kinsa is releasing an accompanying mobile app that allows you to input additional symptom information which helps users better identify their ailment and the most effective treatment options.
  2. Comprehensive data - instead of a static and silod data point (the temperature reading), the Smart Thermometer gathers all sorts of ancillary data directly from sensors built into the mobile device as well as data inputed by users themselves (symptoms). This data provides users and medical practitioners with a more complete picture of your health condition to optimize treatment.  
  3. Global view - by connecting to the broader connected network, Kinsa anonymously aggregates macro health environment information to build a real-time map of human health that can be used at the local level or more broadly.  

Taken together, Kinsa is providing individuals an enriched view of their own health condition as well as the macro health environment with which they interact. In doing so it unlocks a new paradigm for real-time health monitoring with far reaching implications for personal and public health. 

Kinsa is presenting at the Mobile DEMO conference  today and is launching an IndeiGoGo fundraising campaign to spread awareness and find early adopters interested in being at the forefront of this exciting new paradigm. Please check out their page and support their effort to do well by doing good.    


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Feb
27th
Wed
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Good entrepreneurship is like having a delicate recipe cooked by an expert chef with ingredients added in the right amounts at the right time. The recipe for startup success is tough to intuit on your own without the help of good advisors. Those advisors don’t make decisions for management. Their only role is to assist entrepreneurs by giving honest advice, even when it’s uncomfortable to hear. They’re not there for governance, making decisions or casting votes. They’re there to listen, argue, debate and guide, but leave the final decision to the team that’s going to have to execute it.

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IA Ventures Resource Portal

Under the leadership of our awesome community manager intern, Adrian Grant, we are happy to launch our (alpha) startup resource portal. Adrian wrote a nice post describing its intention and vision over on our blog at iaventures.com. I’ve reposted the text here:

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Despite the lowered playing field – thanks Moore’s Law, blogs, and open source hard/software - there’s still a gap between freely available tools and what industry professionals utilize. This variance – or arbitrage opportunity if you will – was the impetus behind us spending the last few months creating a Resource portal. In true lean fashion, we’re launching with some basic best practice materials in hopes of expanding and iterating based on your feedback.

But why launch with templates? Well there have been some great discussions around board packages and investor updates. As early-stage investors we too often find ourselves having to do the delicate dance of extracting data from startups without impeding their momentum. In some ways board meetings and investor updates are analogous to a pit stop in racing. Startups are moving hundreds of miles per hour, yet we (investors) ask them to stop once in awhile to refuel and discuss strategy.

While not as exciting as the actual race, entrepreneurs and investors tend to agree that these touch points are a crucial part of performing well. However, issues often arise when investors have entrepreneurs spinning their wheels doing deep dives into their businesses to unearth superfluous reports that don’t have a productive purpose and causes entrepreneurs to lose focus on what’s really important.

So we’ve pieced together some frameworks that we feel represents a nice balance of conveying meaningful information for stakeholders (investors or otherwise) while being simple enough for entrepreneurs to quickly compile. Please note that these are guides, meant to be modified, with items added/removed as needed.

Access to materials is just one side of the coin however, as nothing-quite substitutes for hands-on experience or learning from experienced people. In the past, like most VC’s, we’ve internally shared great articles to enable our portfolio to learn from others in the trenches. These articles have remained siloed, until now. That’s why in addition to best practice materials, the Resource portal also contains a Library of curated articles we think are must-reads for startups aiming to get a leg up on competitors/incumbents.

You can download these resources, along with browsing our curated library of interesting reads at http://resources.iaventures.com/.  This is by and for the startup community so we’d love to hear your thoughts. Please send them to adrian@iaventures.com or tweet @iaventures.


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Feb
21st
Thu
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From my favorite Swedish sisters who brought us this gem, the beautiful “Waltz for Richard”


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Dec
11th
Tue
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Why *good* companies are getting crunched

The Series A Crunch is real.

But while most of the commentary has focused on the past few years of funding ‘bad’ companies, I’ve actually seen a different flavor of this market trend. In fact, I’ve seen a large number of *good* companies, some really good, that have become victims of the Crunch. 

Let me upack this a bit.

One of the purported benefits of raising capital from seed focused investors (angels and seed stage VCs) is the implicit flexibility to achieve good outcomes for all constituents with smaller exits (i.e. low-mid 10s of millions of dollars). A consequence of this (intended or otherwise) is that many ‘good’ companies with reasonable pathways to low- to mid- double digit million dollar outcomes were funded over the past few years. I describe these companies as ‘good’ because they generally have smart, thoughtful teams that are solving legitimate pain points for real markets of customers. 

The challenge is that while starting a company is less capital intensive than ever, scaling a company still requires lots of coin. As a result, even companies targeting lower range outcomes generally need to raise more than just seed capital to achieve their goals.  

And therein lies the structural capitalization problem for many companies recently funded with seed capital. Many of these companies took capital from seed focused investors that lack the capacity to finance the requisite 5-10mm+ of Series A/B capital necessary to bring a product to market and build a company of substantive value. At the same time, these companies that were reasonably attractive to seed investors who were comfortable with lower range outcomes fail to meet the massive market opportunity thresholds that are required by more traditional VC investors.    

Unfortunately, structural market realities force many of these companies into a bad situation between a rock and a hard place - they’ve raised capital and have achieved some early product or market traction, but still require more capital to create real value and are boxed out from raising it because of the structural requirements of the traditional venture market. 

Does this catch-22 represent an opportunity for new types of liquidity to enter the market and provide critical follow-on financing for companies targeting lower range opportunities? 

Maybe. But I’m skeptical that this market dynamic will lead to new pools of capital. There are two major challenges that I see:

  1. Smaller exit opportunities does not necessarily translate into less risky ventures. There are many markets in which risk and reward are directly and inversely proportional; but in the world of early stage startups, reward is often directly and proportionately linked to the specific size of the target market and does not necessarily imply more or less risk. Series A companies are still fraught with tremendous product, market and execution risk, and as a rule of thumb, investors prefer to accept these risks when the reward for success is massive. When the potential upside is perceived as limited, accepting these prevalent risks becomes a less attractive trade. 
  2. Despite the highly publicized evolution of the venture business (shift to seed, venture platforms, etc), what has not changed is the fundamentals of venture math: many companies will fail, some percentage will return a marginal amount, and the vast majority of portfolio gains will derive from a tiny proportion of home runs. Rarely is it clear at the Series A stage which companies will represent the big winners, and as a result, VCs need to make sure that all of their Series A checks, at very least, have reasonable home run potential.

The fact of the matter is that investing sizable capital beyond the Seed stage requires a fund of scale (for shits and giggles, let’s say $50mm on the low end, though more realistically it is probably multiples of that #), meaning that these funds need to raise capital from traditional venture LPs. Given the challenges I note above, I have a difficult time imagining experienced LPs allocating capital to new strategies that target lower range market opportunities - the risk/reward and venture math just don’t seem to add up.   

So what does this all mean? 

Well, I’m not really sure…but I have a few pieces of advice to offer companies in this zone:

  1. If you are raising follow-on capital right now, do everything in your power to tell a realistic and convincing story that the market opportunity you are pursuing is massive. 
  2. If you are receiving push back on your story, extend runway as far as possible and become laser focused on generating cash flow to organically grow the business. Fight your ass off to become cash flow positive, and in doing so, earn the right to control your own destiny.
  3. If it is clear that you need more capital, seriously consider a seed-extension or small Series A at a marginal bump up in value (or even a down-round). Yes, you will likely be further along than most seed stage companies. Yes, you will have built a functional product with early market traction - generally milestones meriting normal Series A consideration. And yes, this approach will be meaningfully dilutive. But if you keep pricing down enough you may be able to attract good venture capital by offering an attractive risk/reward balance. And even if you are able to raise capital successfully, revert to #2 above for your game plan once you have the money safely in your bank account.   

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Nov
27th
Tue
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Our Brave New World: mobile connectivity and the Internet of Things

My colleague Jesse introduced me to a very cool new company called Silvercar (read more about it here). Silvercar, is building a fleet of ‘smart’ rental cars. It uses your mobile device to identify the renter and unlock the door, personalize the in-car preferences (radio, mapping calender itinerary info to GPS, etc.), streamline the pickup and drop-off process (no waiting in line at stupid rental counter), and automatically make payments (including responsible gas refill charges).

Silvercar is a great example of a wave of emerging innovation that we are seeing penetrating all sorts of old markets with mobile-centric, stream-lined and hyper functional ‘uber-like’ experiences. This wave leverages the hyper-connectivity of physical things and affords a simple, efficient and intelligent user experience through the mobile device (as well as through the desktop, though less interestingly and probably less functionally important). 

While still early days, we’re seeing this type of innovation upend all sorts of old markets including transportation, healthcare, energy, hotels, and other areas as well. 

What I love about this type of innovation is how it transcends the purely digital world and literally touches our physical lives - we rent cars, we monitor the health of our body, we adjust the temperature in our homes. This trend lies at the intersection of extreme mobile connectivity and the promise of “Internet of Things”; a world in which our physical objects are “smart” - not only capturing, analyzing and responding to data, but also connecting to one another accepting input from other connected objects and transmitting output back to the connected network.

Incredibly enough, this is no longer the future, but the world we now live in today.       

Quick poll - 

What everyday physical, real-world experiences would like to see improved w/uber-like simplicity and efficiency leveraging our mobile devices?


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Oct
19th
Fri
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INSANELY awesome Phish / Vanilla Ice remix


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Oct
16th
Tue
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Deploying capital is easy; getting it back is hard

Often times in our line of work (or any investment area for that matter), there is a sense that making investments is what our business is all about. Investments are sexy. Investments receive lots of attention. Investments make the participants feel good. Investments are entered into with the naive optimism of the possible. We think about what could be, the bright future, the lives we impact, the industries transformed. We think about building a big company with tons of employees and legions of adoring customers. We think about making boat loads of money. We think about changing the world. 

And then reality sinks in. Tech is hard to build. Team takes longer to hire than anticipated. Partners aren’t living up to expectation. Operational challenges are hindering execution. Product release gets a lukewarm response. Competition is heating up. The economy sucks. Cash is running a bit too tight for comfort. Internal tensions surface. 

It’s during these trying times while experiencing the real shit that inevitably goes down along the journey that I’ve come to internalize that our business is not about making investments, it’s about building companies; and if there is anything that I’ve learned to appreciate over the last three years it’s that building companies from a standing start of nothing is damn damn hard. In our business, making the investment is the easy part. Building something productive and of tangible value is the hard part. Not a single day goes by that I don’t think about the sage words my father-in-law once shared with me: “deploying capital is really easy; it’s getting it back that’s hard.”

That is why today I am so excited for my friend, former roommate, and portfolio CEO Eli Portnoy and his co-founder and partner John Hinnegen who announced that their company Thinknear has been bought by Telenav. Eli and John are exemplary entrepreneurs, having started the Company two years ago with one idea, recognizing an unforeseen pain through their own early experience, pivoting into a completely new model based upon that experience, and nailing execution so much so that they became invaluable to their strategic partner who felt compelled to buy the Company outright. It was not an easy ride by any stretch, but it was always purposeful, educational, exciting and fun. I am blessed to have had a front row seat as a board member watching Eli, John and team build a truly impactful company that will drive value creation for years to come. 

While I imagine every exit feels pretty good, this one will always hold a special place in my heart. First and foremost, it is our first exit at IA Ventures representing a major milestone in the life of our young fund. Second, it is the first exit that I have been a part of, the experience of which has been incredibly valuable to my growth as a young VC. And finally, it is incredibly special that this milestone transaction was made possible by someone whom I’ve known as a close friend since my first day of college more than 12 years ago when I walked into the dorm room that Eli and I shared for the next year and a half. 

Congrats to Eli, John and the entire Thinknear team on a job incredibly well done. As us Hebrews like to say; may you go from strength to strength!


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Oct
11th
Thu
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We’re hiring a General Manager!

We’re excited to announce that we are hiring a General Manager

Since launching IA Ventures nearly three years ago, we have lived by the ethos that we are a start-up investing in start-ups. Like the companies we invest in, we constantly look internally at what we’re doing well and where we can improve to enhance the product that we put forth in market. As part of this effort, we believe there is an important opportunity to build out and improve the platform of products and services we offer our portfolio companies and the broader startup and data communities at large.

What you’ll do:
The GM will own the platform, products, and services for our customer — the startups we invest in. This includes creating reusable best practice resources, fostering connections between functional disciplines (marketing, sales, finance, etc) across the portfolio, and organizing events like our annual Founders meetup. Ultimately though, it is up to the GM to identify and implement those solutions that best serve the needs of our portfolio. The value the GM creates for the companies is the primary measure of success. 

Since it is critical that the GM deeply understand our companies and their needs, the GM will actively participate in investment team meetings and be expected to contribute to the conversation about potential investments and existing portfolio companies. While the principal focus of this position will be working directly with the existing portfolio, the GM will also be charged with a secondary responsibility of facilitating support for and engagement with the broader tech community.

Who you are:
While we have some broad ideas to kickstart the platform, the GM will think and act like an entrepreneur - experimenting with ideas, releasing early and often, learning from scoped tests, and iterating and improving the suite of products and services. The successful candidate will necessarily live and breathe startups with a deep understanding of the ecosystem, be an avid user of emerging products, and have substantive technical acumen with capacity to either directly build or manage the buildout of potential products.

How you’ll stand out:

  • A demonstrated passion for start-ups and tech. Start-up operating experience is a plus
  • Net native - you should be an active user of emerging technologies
  • Extremely creative and entrepreneurial
  • Exceptional organizational and execution skills
  • Strong interpersonal skills
  • Engineering skills are a plus. At a minimum, you must be demonstrably tech savvy

To learn more about who we are, what we value, and how we invest, check out iaventures.com and our team’s Twitter profiles.

Please apply with this link before Thursday, November 1st at 11:59pm Eastern. We will reply back to you with next steps by the following Friday the 9th.


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Oct
10th
Wed
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How business school changed my life

There are lots of reasons to go to business school -

  1. broad education of business fundamentals
  2. great network of future movers and shakers
  3. piece of (expensive) paper that will help you land a good job down the road
  4. opportunity to reset and/or pivot your career
  5. break from the ‘real world’ to enjoy student life again

While the aforementioned are probably the most commonly sited reasons to go back to school, my personal experience highlighted something that was not immediately obvious when I entered Columbia in the fall of 2007. Business school was a sandbox to experiment with and explore different real world careers. 

I had two transformational experiences as a student, both of which were internships, that shaped the path I’ve taken since graduating and expect to continue upon for the rest of my life.

My first internship between first and second year was at boutique investment bank called Allen and Company. Allen and Co. is a very unique place. While it is extremely well known and respected within the tech and media worlds (maybe you have heard of the Sun Valley Conference hosted by the firm each summer), it somehow remains extremely secretive and flies under the radar with the general public (they don’t even have a website!). As a merchant bank that offers top tier advisory work in tech and media AND principally invests in many of the most exciting tech startups, Allen was a great place to spend the summer given my background in finance and interest in early stage investing and tech startups. If there was ever a firm in ‘traditional finance’ that would fit me well, it would be Allen and Co. And yet, I walked away from that summer realizing more than ever that traditional finance would never fulfill my personal and professional aspirations. I didn’t particularly enjoy the work functions and still found myself feeling too far removed from impacting the outcome of the companies we worked with. This realization was not easy to accept - emotionally and psychologically - as it meant risking the opportunity to make boatloads of money and walking away from whatever it is that makes finance kinda sexy. At the end of the day, I was just not inspired by the work and came to grips with the personal implications of it over that summer.      

Fortunately, I had the wonderful opportunity to meet Roger Ehrenberg early into my second year at school. I had actually stumbled upon Roger’s blog while interning at Allen and Co. (I believe it was this awesome post that hooked me) and while perusing Roger’s site noticed that he had amassed quite an impressive portfolio of angel investments. As head of the venture capital club at CBS, I invited Roger to participate on a venture panel on campus where I proceeded to meet Roger and attempt to pimp myself out as his personal intern. Roger, of course, summarily dismissed me, but not before making a critical introduction on my behalf that changed my life. 

It just so happened that Roger was about to lead a seed round for a very interesting early stage company that had just moved to NYC. (Keep in mind 2008 was still a time when angel investors could generally lead seed round, price and structure deals, take board seats, etc. This is less common today as there is more institutional capital focused on the Seed stage). The company had a brilliant founder and a product in market with paying customers, but in reality there was no ‘company’ as at that point it was literally one man show (yes, no co-founders or employees) with no infrastructure that could possibly constitute a real company. Roger suggested I meet the founder and see if there was an opportunity to work together. The following week the founder and I met for coffee and hit it off, leading to my second transformational experience during business school. I spent the next five months interning for this company. I was tasked with everything from setting up the basic operational infrastructure to building the first usable financial model to crafting our first board deck to conducting competitive research to making early BD calls to thinking through our hiring and team buildout strategy. I was officially an intern and yet found myself actively participating in our first board meeting! I was the CEOs right hand man for those five months and it was awesome. I felt invigorated and excited. And I knew that I had found my calling.

[The rest of the story is that after insufferably nagging Roger for a meeting, we finally met for a lunch at which I proposed ways to bring some sanity and organization into his angel investing life as well as ways in which I could serve as an operational and business resource to his portfolio of early stage companies (as I had done during my internship). My proposal serendipitously coincided with Roger’s own contemplation of how he could formalize his efforts with more structure and possibly a fund down the road. Our lunch led to more discussions, which eventually led to contract work where I split my time heading up operations and finance for a company we were incubating as well as helping Roger with his angel investing. I moved onto the investment side full time when we launched IA Ventures in January of 2010.]

At the end of the day, business school afforded me the opportunity to pursue two awesome, but very different, real world experiences in a safe and scoped way. The first gave me conviction to move away from a path that I subconsciously struggled to abandon, while the second solidified my passion for building transformative tech companies and gave me the courage to pursue that path. While I’m also grateful for the other benefits of business school, it were these two particular experiences that fundamentally changed my life. 


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Aug
5th
Sun
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I will never ever ever get tired of this song. A beautiful rendition by Jason Mraz.

(Source: Spotify)


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Jul
2nd
Mon
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Beautiful Sufjan Stevens “Greetings From Michigan, The Great Lakes State” (via @siguy)

(Source: Spotify)


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